Food and Fandom: Zelie’s Jollof Rice

Well, maybe not Zelie’s and more like Zelie’s mom.

I haven’t finished Children of Blood and Bone just yet, but there were two dishes I really wanted to try out when I started reading it. The first was this coconut pie that Amari really wanted to eat but was kind of unable to because circumstances and plot. On the other hand, the other dish was the first thing I was hit with in the book.

I try not to think of her.

But when I do, I think of rice.

When Mama was around, the hut always smelled of jollof rice.

Now, as a Filipino, I grew up on appreciating the beauty that is rice. I grew up appreciating the fact that there isn’t just the ONE rice brand to end all rice brands (though as far as I’m concerned, jasmine rice beats out all the rest). So when I saw this mention of jollof rice, I needed to do a bit of research to see what makes this different, from, say, fried rice or something (though even fried rice has a different set of ingredients to it depending on the culture you’re looking at).

And ya know, I kind of dig it.

I found the jollof rice recipe at Naija Chef, and just browsing through his recipe list has definitely gotten me curious over what other types of food I could try from the site’s collection. There are DESSERTS THERE, DAMMIT. I might also even try something with fish, because fish was such a big deal in the first few chapters of CoBaB.

When I had my family taste test the rice, they seemed to like it enough. It had this nice sweet kick to it, though in hindsight, I probably didn’t need to use parboiled rice for it. To me, it was good, but the rice got overcooked and was way too soft-textured, which I didn’t like as much as I thought I would. If I make this again, I’ll probably add an extra cup of rice (maybe long-grain? I might have to experiment there) or lessen the tomato sauce.

Verdict: All in all, though, the flavors were all there, and it really made for a lovely combination with some fried pork chops!

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